Leading solar fuels research since 1994
 

Welcome!

The Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis is a collaborative research environment with the purpose of advancing the science and utilization of solar fuels - fuel from solar energy. We bring together leading scientists with expertise in molecular biology, biophysics and biochemistry, synthetic chemistry and chemical physics.

The Consortium was started in 1994. Since then we have assembled the necessary expertise in an integrated research body, known as the Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis.

Here we present who we are and what is going on in our research. We invite anyone who wants to know more about artificial photosynthesis and solar fuels to follow the links to the homepages of our researchers.  

Welcome!

 News

September 27: Rui Miao, Hao Xie and Peter Lindblad published an article in Biotechnology for biofuels:

Enhancement of photosynthetic isobutanol production in engineered cells of Synechocystis PCC 6803.

Abstract:

Cyanobacteria, oxygenic photoautotrophic prokaryotes, can be engineered to produce various valuable chemicals from solar energy and CO2 in direct processes. The concept of photosynthetic production of isobutanol, a promising chemical and drop-in biofuel, has so far been demonstrated for Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. In Synechocystis PCC 6803, a heterologous expression of α-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from Lactococcus lactis resulted in an isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol producing strain. Kivd was identified as a bottleneck in the metabolic pathway and its activity was further improved by reducing the size of its substratebinding pocket with a single replacement of serine-286 to threonine. However, isobutanol production still remained low.
In the present study, we report on how cultivation conditions significantly affect the isobutanol production
in Synechocystis PCC 6803. A HCl-titrated culture grown under medium light showed the highest isobutanol production with an in-flask titer of 194 mg/L after 10 days, and 435 mg/L at day 40. This corresponds to a cumulative isobutanol production of 911 mg/L, with a maximal production rate of 43.6 mg/L day. The present study demonstrates the importance of a suitable cultivation condition to enhance isobutanol production in Synechocystis PCC 6803. Chemostat should be used to further increase both the total titer as well as the rate of production. Furthermore, identified bottleneck, Kivd, should be expressed at the highest level to further enhance isobutanol production.

June 28: Wai Ling Kwong, Cheng Choo Lee, Andrey Shchukarev, Erik Björn and Johannes Messinger published an article in Journal of Catalysis:

High-performance iron (III) oxide electrocatalyst for water oxidation in strongly acidic media. 

Abstract:

Stable and efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts for the oxidation of water to dioxygen in highly acidic media are currently limited to expensive noble metal (Ir and Ru) oxides since presently known OER catalysts made of inexpensive earth-abundant materials generally suffer anodic corrosion at low pH. In this study, we report that a mixed-polymorph film comprising maghemite and hematite, prepared using spray pyrolysis deposition followed by low-temperature annealing, showed a sustained OER rate (>24 h) corresponding to a current density of 10 mA cm−2 at an initial overpotential of 650 mV, with a Tafel slope of only 56 mV dec−1 and near-100% Faradaic efficiency in 0.5 M H2SO4 (pH 0.3). This performance is remarkable, since iron (III) oxide films comprising only maghemite were found to exhibit a comparable intrinsic activity, but considerably lower stability for OER, while films of pure hematite were OER-inactive. These results are explained by the differences in the polymorph crystal structures, which cause different electrical conductivity and surface interactions with water molecules and protons. Our findings not only reveal the potential of iron (III) oxide as acid-stable OER catalyst, but also highlight the important yet hitherto largely unexplored effect of crystal polymorphism on electrocatalytic OER performance.

Participants in the CAP workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, April 26-27, 2018.













Participants in the CAP workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, April 26-27, 2018.

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Last updated September 28 2018