Leading solar fuels research since 1994
 

Welcome!

The Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis is a collaborative research environment with the purpose of advancing the science and utilization of solar fuels - fuel from solar energy. We bring together leading scientists with expertise in molecular biology, biophysics and biochemistry, synthetic chemistry and chemical physics.

The Consortium was started in 1994. Since then we have assembled the necessary expertise in an integrated research body, known as the Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis.

Here we present who we are and what is going on in our research. We invite anyone who wants to know more about artificial photosynthesis and solar fuels to follow the links to the homepages of our researchers.  

Welcome!

News

March 4, 2019: CAP scientists in the TV news

At the CAP meeting in Umeå, CAP researchers were discussing future hydrogen technology. We also had the chance to test drive a fuel cell vehicle that runs on hydrogen gas. Swedish public service television filmed the event, which can be watched here: Vätgasbilar spås ha nyckelroll i framtiden


January 2019:  Bo Xu, Lei Tian, Ahmed S.Etman, Junliang Sun, and Haining Tian published an article in Nano energy:

Solution-processed nanoporous NiO-dye-ZnO photocathodes: Toward efficient and stable solid-state p-type dye-sensitized solar cells and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells.

Abstract: 

A solution-processed NiO-dye-ZnO photocathode was developed for applications in both solid-state p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-ssDSCs) and p-type dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (p-DSPECs). In p-ssDSCs, the solar cell using ZnO as electron transport material showed a short circuit current, up to 680 µA cm−2, which is 60-fold larger than that previously reported device using TiO2 as electron transport material with similar architecture. In the p-DSPECs, a remarkable photocurrent of 100 μA cm−2 was achieved in a pH = 5.0 acetate buffer solution under a bias potential at 0.05 V vs RHE with platinum as the proton reduction catalyst. A Faradaic efficiency approaching 100% for the H2 evolution reaction was obtained after photoelectrolysis for 9 h. Importantly, the solution-processed NiO-dye-ZnO photocathode exhibited excellent long-term stability in both p-ssDSCs and p-DSPECs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where a solution-processable, nanoporous NiO-dye-ZnO photocathode is used for both p-ssDSCs and p-DSPECs having both excellent device performance and stability.



November 30, 2018: Kasper Skov Kjær, Nidhi Kaul, Om Prakash, Pavel Chábera, Nils W. Rosemann, Alireza Honarfar, Olga Gordivska, Lisa A. Fredin, Karl-Erik Bergquist, Lennart Häggström, Tore Ericsson, Linnea Lindh, Arkady Yartsev, Stenbjörn Styring, Ping Huang, Jens Uhlig, Jesper Bendix, Daniel Strand, Villy Sundström, Petter Persson, Reiner Lomoth, and Kenneth Wärnmark published an article in Science:

Luminescence and reactivity of a charge-transfer excited iron complex with nanosecond lifetime.

Abstract: 

Iron’s abundance and rich coordination chemistry are potentially appealing features for photochemical applications. However, the photoexcitable charge-transfer (CT) states of most Fe complexes are limited by picosecond or sub-picosecond deactivation through low-lying metal centered (MC) states, resulting in inefficient electron transfer reactivity and complete lack of photoluminescence. Here we show that octahedral coordination of Fe(III) by two mono-anionic facial tris-carbene ligands can suppress such deactivation dramatically. 

The resulting complex [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+, where phtmeimb is [phenyl(tris(3-methylimidazol-1-ylidene))borate]-, exhibits strong, visible, room temperature photoluminescence with a 2.0 ns lifetime and 2% quantum yield via spin-allowed transition from a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (2LMCT) state to the ground state (2GS). Reductive and oxidative electron transfer reactions were observed for the 2LMCT state of [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in bimolecular quenching studies with methylviologen and diphenylamine.


Fig. 2Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in dry acetonitrile at room temperature.

(A) Cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. (B) Optical absorption (left black curve), normalized photoluminescence (right black) and normalized excitation spectra (red circles). (C) Visible orange photoluminescence of 50 μM [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in acetonitrile upon 532 nm excitation.


Participants in the CAP workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, April 26-27, 2018.

Participants in the CAP workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, April 26-27, 2018.


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Last updated March 7 2019