Leading solar fuels research since 1994
 

Welcome!

The Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis is a collaborative research environment with the purpose of advancing the science and utilization of solar fuels - fuel from solar energy. We bring together leading scientists with expertise in molecular biology, biophysics and biochemistry, synthetic chemistry and chemical physics.

The Consortium was started in 1994. Since then we have assembled the necessary expertise in an integrated research body, known as the Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis.

Here we present who we are and what is going on in our research. We invite anyone who wants to know more about artificial photosynthesis and solar fuels to follow the links to the homepages of our researchers.  

Welcome!

News

November 30: Kasper Skov Kjær, Nidhi Kaul, Om Prakash, Pavel Chábera, Nils W. Rosemann, Alireza Honarfar, Olga Gordivska, Lisa A. Fredin, Karl-Erik Bergquist, Lennart Häggström, Tore Ericsson, Linnea Lindh, Arkady Yartsev, Stenbjörn Styring, Ping Huang, Jens Uhlig, Jesper Bendix, Daniel Strand, Villy Sundström, Petter Persson, Reiner Lomoth, and Kenneth Wärnmark published an article in Science:

Luminescence and reactivity of a charge-transfer excited iron complex with nanosecond lifetime.

Abstract: 

Iron’s abundance and rich coordination chemistry are potentially appealing features for photochemical applications. However, the photoexcitable charge-transfer (CT) states of most Fe complexes are limited by picosecond or sub-picosecond deactivation through low-lying metal centered (MC) states, resulting in inefficient electron transfer reactivity and complete lack of photoluminescence. Here we show that octahedral coordination of Fe(III) by two mono-anionic facial tris-carbene ligands can suppress such deactivation dramatically. 

The resulting complex [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+, where phtmeimb is [phenyl(tris(3-methylimidazol-1-ylidene))borate]-, exhibits strong, visible, room temperature photoluminescence with a 2.0 ns lifetime and 2% quantum yield via spin-allowed transition from a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (2LMCT) state to the ground state (2GS). Reductive and oxidative electron transfer reactions were observed for the 2LMCT state of [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in bimolecular quenching studies with methylviologen and diphenylamine.


Fig. 2Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in dry acetonitrile at room temperature.

(A) Cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. (B) Optical absorption (left black curve), normalized photoluminescence (right black) and normalized excitation spectra (red circles). (C) Visible orange photoluminescence of 50 μM [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in acetonitrile upon 532 nm excitation.


September 25: Adam Wegelius,  Namita Khanna,  Charlène Esmieu,  Giovanni Davide Barone,  Filipe Pinto,  Paula Tamagnini,  Gustav Berggren and Peter Lindblad published an article in Energy & Environmental Science:

Generation of a functional, semisynthetic [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase in a photosynthetic microorganism.

Abstract:

[FeFe]-Hydrogenases are hydrogen producing metalloenzymes with excellent catalytic capacities, highly relevant in the context of a future hydrogen economy. Here we demonstrate the synthetic activation of a heterologously expressed [FeFe]-hydrogenase in living cells of Synechocystis PCC 6803, a photoautotrophic microbial chassis with high potential for biotechnological energy applications. H2-Evolution assays clearly show that the non-native, semi-synthetic enzyme links to the native metabolism in living cells.


Participants in the CAP workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, April 26-27, 2018.

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Last updated December 5 2018